Tomorrow I am going to Las Vegas to work a conference (sadly not for pleasure). Since I will be working the event I have long 12-hour days ahead of me. But I am not too upset about it because the overtime pay is great! I will be coming back 6 am Saturday so I can still set up Doughnuts and Art.

I am bringing my laptop this time, so I hope I can find some cheap or free wireless. I would like to still update this a few times next week. I hear that I might have trouble because nothing is free in Vegas. I know they say drinks are free, but how much money are you losing in the slot machine to get it? Wish me luck!

Share →

4 Responses to Las Vegas, Here I Come

  1. emily says:

    Don’t forget to take pictures so that I know what I’m getting into when I go this summer!
    Oh and I will try and not burn the house down while you’re gone. hahaha

  2. Andrew says:

    I’m listening to your newest podcast and the VT teacher who sacrificed himself came up, and I thought I’d put this up.
    “It is only in emergency situations that one should volunteer to help strangers, if it is in one’s power. For instance, a man who values human life and is caught in a shipwreck, should help to save his fellow passengers (though not at the expense of his own life).” —The Ethics of Emergencies, Virtue of Selfishness, Ayn RandAnd [background:talking about saving a drowning person]“If the person to be saved is not a stranger, then the risk one should be willing to take is greater in proportion to the greatness of that person’s value to oneself. If it is the man or woman one loves, then one can be willing to give one’s own life to save him or her – for the selfish reason that life without the loved person could be unbearable.” I think that since he was a teacher, he valued his students greatly and would not be able to bear the loss, so it was a selfish thing to do to protect his students.

  3. Dug says:

    I smell smoke

  4. Dear friend of Objectivism,

    The Undercurrent would appreciate your help promoting its upcoming issue. We respect your time, so thanks in advance just for this email. If you are so inclined, please consider doing one or more of the following. Thanks Kindly!

    (1) Blog the announcement from the Undercurrent (attached below).

    (2) Read and comment on any of our latest articles. In particular, you may find interesting the interview with Onkar Ghate on free speech.

    (3) If you think the Undercurrent is doing good work, consider adding us to your blogroll.

    (4) If you feel strongly about the value of the Undercurrent, encourage your readers to get involved with the paper, whether as distributors, officers, or donors.

    (5) If you feel strongly about the disvalue of distributing a campus paper (or the Undercurrent in particular), consider blogging your thoughts and starting a discussion. We suspect that there are Objectivists who do not think that the Undercurrent is an effective tool for promoting Objectivism. If so, we’d like to hear why. Does it have something to do with TU’s content in particular? Is it more a general issue of the effectiveness of a campus paper as a medium for spreading Objectivism? Or is it the whole activity of campus activism in general that these Objectivists view as ineffective? Whether or not you personally hold any of these views, by starting a discussion on this issue, you can help bring out such arguments, and help us figure out the best possible way to promote Objectivism on college campuses.

    (6) Even if you do not have the time or inclination to blog about the Undercurrent, send us a quick private email of your overall impression of our efforts. Are you generally impressed, indifferent, too busy to notice, or disappointed? We are very open to criticism, and sincerely want to hear your thoughts. [Private emails can be sent to mail@the-undercurrent.com]

    Thank you again for your time,

    Student of Objectivism
    http://studentofobjectivism.blogspot.com/
    Distribution Officer
    The Undercurrent

    Mass email below:

    Dear friend of Objectivism,

    The Undercurrent is now welcoming orders for its upcoming issue. The issue will be mailed out at the end of April, and is intended for distribution from May through September. Orders can be placed at http://www.the-undercurrent.com/?s=distribute.

    The issue will feature a penetrating interview on freedom of speech with Onkar Ghate, the Dean of the Objectivist Academic Center. The interview discusses, in depth, the nature and philosophic justification for the right to free speech.

    In addition, the issue will include a campus commentary (by Kelly Cadenas) on recent free speech violations, an article arguing that capitalism is not only practical but moral, Peter Schwartz’s excellent ARI op-ed, “In Defense of Income Inequality”, and our regular ad for the Atlas Shrugged Essay Contest. Please visit our website to preview this content.

    Remember, distributing the Undercurrent is not a major time commitment. All you need to do is take a few minutes once or twice a week to drop off the paper at a campus newsstand or coffee shop. If cost is an issue, let us know and we will work with you to find a sponsor in your area to pay for your copies.

    Because May is exam period at most schools, it is a time when students are spending more time on campus, studying, meeting professors, waiting before and after exams. For this reason, it is a time when they are more likely than ever to pick up and peruse a paper like the Undercurrent. Please help us maximize this opportunity.

    Please help us bring Ayn Rand’s ideas to your campus,

    -The Undercurrent

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>